Pakistan Flooding

Situation:

The worst flooding in Pakistan‘s history has cut a swath of destruction from the northern mountain regions to wheat fields in the south. The Indus River breached its banks again on Saturday, August 14, in Southern Pakistan, bringing even more devastation to the area. 

Government and humanitarian estimates put the number of displaced between 16-20 million people. At least 1,500 people have been killed, millions have lost their homes, crops and livestock, and heavily trafficked roads and bridges have disappeared. 

crs

 

Pakistan Flooding 

Situation:

The worst flooding in Pakistan‘s history has cut a swath of destruction from the northern mountain regions to wheat fields in the south. The Indus River breached its banks again on Saturday, August 14, in Southern Pakistan, bringing even more devastation to the area. 

Government and humanitarian estimates put the number of displaced between 16-20 million people. At least 1,500 people have been killed, millions have lost their homes, crops and livestock, and heavily trafficked roads and bridges have disappeared. 

The situation in Sindh Province (Southern Pakistan) continues to deteriorate. The UN now estimates that hundreds of thousands of people from Sindh are on the move, fleeing from both existing and anticipated flood waters. The government is beginning to establish camps in these areas. 

Meanwhile, the situation appears to be stabilizing in the northeast. There have only been scattered showers over the past few days, creating more favorable conditions for the delivery of aid. Standing floodwaters remain in three districts, although not in CRS’ area of operation. 

CRS Response:

Though hampered by washed-out roads and bridges, CRS has reached thousands of people in the north and southwest parts of the country. The main needs in the affected areas are shelter, drinking water, food and medicines, and CRS has provided nearly 2,300 homeless families in Balochistan with shelter and hygiene materials as well as water purification tablets, plastic sheeting and cookware. 

CRS engineers are now in the process of repairing seven separate water systems in the region, serving tens of thousands of people. The agency has years of experience building and repairing water systems in remote mountainous areas of Pakistan, having worked on hundreds of systems following the 2005 earthquake in Pakistan. 

CRS briefly had to evacuate its office in Besham, Shangla, on Sunday, August 8, because of rising floodwaters, but staff returned the next day. 

Once the most immediate needs are met, CRS will help farmers and others to regain their means of earning a living. In several areas including Swat, CRS is planning 17 cash-for-work projects, paying people affected by the disaster to build irrigation channels, pathways and retaining walls.