Preparing for the Roman Missal, Third Edition

More than 500 people gathered at the Orlando Airport Marriott Hotel August 25-27 for the Orlando Liturgical Conference which focused on the new English translation of the Roman Missal, third edition.

The new translation uses more formal language that better reflects the dignity of the Sacred Liturgy and will be prayed at Mass beginning the first Sunday of Advent, November 27.

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More than 500 people gathered at the Orlando Airport Marriott Hotel August 25-27 for the Orlando Liturgical Conference which focused on the new English translation of the Roman Missal, third edition.

The new translation uses more formal language that better reflects the dignity of the Sacred Liturgy and will be prayed at Mass beginning the first Sunday of Advent, November 27.

 “It is a more exalted style, but we don’t speak the same way in liturgy as in the street,” said Father Paul Turner, keynote speaker at the Orlando Liturgical Conference. “I think the words will fit the ceremony because the ceremony has serious intent and has a way of lifting-up our minds and hearts to God.”

Father Turner is pastor of St. Munchin Parish in Cameron, Missouri, a prolific author who holds a doctorate in sacred theology from Sant’ Anselmo in Rome and whose own enthusiasm is contagious.

“In going through the process of translation, the prayers have a deeper meaning,” Father Turner added. “They will hold up very well under repetition and meditation.”

Blessed Pope John Paul II announced the revised translation of the text in celebration of the jubilee year 2000. It is finally completed and many parishes around the Diocese of Orlando have begun preparing Catholics for what to expect on November 27.

The Liturgical Conference is organized by the Diocese of Orlando Office of Liturgy and Music every two years to help parish leaders, including priests, deacons, religious sisters and Christ’s faithful stay informed of liturgical best practices. With the new English translation of the Roman Missal just three months away, attendees were grateful for the opportunity to hear from national and local experts.

“I’ve learned new ways to introduce the Roman Missal, 3rd edition and to honor the translation in a richer way. This is saving me so much time and research,” said Helen Telep-Gonzalez, pastoral associate, St. Matthew Parish, Winter Haven. “The key is helping people to understand the Mass is not changing,”

What exactly is changing? The structure of the Mass (the order of the elements, the actions of the priest celebrant, and so forth) remains unchanged in the new edition of the Roman Missal. However, the translation of the prayer texts will change to more closely reflect the original Latin texts. In some cases, new options for prayers may be available, and some old options may no longer be present.

Father Bob Webster, director of the Diocese of Orlando Office of Liturgy said “it’s critical” that parish leaders fully understand the impact of the Roman Missal, third edition.

“We are laying a foundation for parish ministry leaders and volunteers and working to energize them so they can be good ambassadors and reassure people this is not a new Roman Missal. It’s a rephrasing according to new translation principles that open our eyes, ears and heart to new understanding.”

Father Gilbert Medina, Parochial Administrator, St. Mary of the Lakes Parish, Eustis attended all three days of the Orlando Liturgical Conference.

“I’m extremely positive about the changes. The language is richer and more meaningful and worthy of who God is. We’re talking about the glory of God. He deserves the very best.”